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Mt. Cabot Trail
State: NH
A relatively popular trail due to its trailhead being closer to many areas than the Mill Brook and Berlin Fish Hatchery alternatives, the Mt. Cabot Trail provided a fairly direct route to the summit of Mt. Cabot.

Mt. Cabot Trail Details
Also Known As:
Location: White Mountains - Kilkenny
Peak: Mt. Cabot
Opened: Early 1900s?
Closed: 2000
Reason Closed: Landowner closed lower portion of trail
Guidebook Descriptions:
1931 AMC White Mountain Guide
Mount Cabot
This mountain, situated in Kilkenny, has an altitude of about 4,190 ft. The summit is wooded, but an observation-tower as been constructed at a good view-point about 1/3 m. S.E. There is a camp near the tower connected by telephone with Lancaster, and occupied during the greater part of the summer by a fire-warden, F.C. Leavitt, whose P.O. address is Lancaster. Mt. Cabot was named by the late W. H. Peek, in honor of Sebastian Cabot, the famous pilot. An excellent N.H.F.D. path, which has been traversed by horses for its entire length, leads from the Terrence White farm.
The path (N.H.F.D.) begins at the White farm about 6 m. E. of the village of Lancaster, at a wood-road within a few yards of the house, and follows N.E. toward Bunnell Notch, which lies between Mt. Cabot and Terrace Mountain. The wood-road passes one or two small camps and then crosses the Kilkenny rail-road, now abandoned and grass-grown, which leads to the base of Round Mountain and the U.S.F.S. Trail through Willard Notch. Two more camps are passed and then the telephone line to the summit enters the path and continues there practically all the way up the mountain. Passing through a gateway, the path follows a logging road and soon comes in sight of the North Branch, a stream flowing down from Bunnell Notch, and after following its S. bank for some time, becomes a path again.
About 2 m. from the White farm the path, which has thus far led directly toward Bunnell Notch, turns sharply to the N. Continuing toward Mt. Cabot, the path immediately crosses the North Branch. It leads N.W., then N.E., and the real ascent of the mountain begins, the path following a zigzag course up the S. ridge, and making a big loop to the S., from which there is a view down into bare, fire-swept Bunnell Notch. The path, which continues unmistakable, affords views of Lancaster, Mt. Lafayette, and the Mount Washington Range.
For the last m. up the mountain the path passes through a low, sweet-scented forest and comes out directly at the camp and tower. The true summit, which is wooded, lies about 1/3 m. N. of the tower, but there is no trail leading to it. Within 5 min. of the camp there is a spring, which is reached by continuing a few rods beyond the tower to a short trail descending to the E.
Distances. White farm to the crossing of North Branch about 2 m.; to camp and tower about 4 m.

1934 AMC White Mountain Guide
Mount Cabot
This mountain, in Kilkenny, has a wooded summit, but there is an observation-tower 1/3 m. S.E. There is a camp near the tower connected by telephone with Lancaster, and occupied during the greater part of the summer by a fire-warden, J.W. Tucker, whose P.O. address is Lancaster. Mt. Cabot was named by the late W. H. Peek, in honor of Sebastian Cabot, the famous pilot. An excellent N.H.F.D. path, which has been traversed by horses for its entire length, leads from the Terrence White farm.
The path (N.H.F.D.) begins at the White farm about 6 m. E. of the village of Lancaster, at a wood-road within a few yards of the house, and follows N.E. toward Bunnell Notch, which lies between Mt. Cabot and Terrace Mountain. The wood-road passes one or two small camps and then crosses the Kilkenny rail-road, now abandoned and grass-grown, which leads to the base of Round Mountain and the W.M.N.F.. Trail through Willard Notch. Two more camps are passed and then the telephone line to the summit enters the path and continues there practically all the way up the mountain. Passing through a gateway, the path follows a logging road and soon comes in sight of the North Branch, a stream flowing down from Bunnell Notch, and, after following its S. bank for some time, becomes a path again.
About 2 m. from the White farm the path, which has thus far led directly toward Bunnell Notch, turns sharply to the N. Continuing toward Mt. Cabot, the path immediately crosses the North Branch. It leads N.W., then N.E., and the real ascent of the mountain begins, the path following a zigzag course up the S. ridge, and making a big loop to the S., from which there is a view down into bare, fire-swept Bunnell Notch. The path, which continues unmistakable, affords views of Lancaster, Mt. Lafayette, and the Mount Washington Range.
For the last m. up the mountain the path passes through a low, sweet-scented forest and comes out directly at the camp and tower. The true summit, which is wooded, lies about 1/3 m. N. of the tower, but there is no trail leading to it. Within 5 min. of the camp there is a spring, which is reached by continuing a few rods beyond the tower to a short trail descending to the E.
Distances. White farm to the crossing of North Branch about 2 m.; to camp and tower about 4 m.

1940 AMC White Mountain Guide
Mount Cabot (4,190 ft.)
This mountain, in Kilkenny, has a wooded summit, but there is an observation tower 1/3 m. SE. A camp near the tower is connected by telephone with Lancaster, and occupied during the greater part of the summer by a look-out watchman. Mt. Cabot was named by W.H. Peek, in honor of Sebastian Cabot, the famous pilot. An NHFD path, leads from the Terrence White farm.
This path begins at the White farm about 6/12 m. E of the village of Lancaster, at a wood-road within a few yards of the house, and follows NE toward Bunnell Notch, which lies between Mt. Cabot and Terrace Mountain. The wood-road passes one or two small camps then crosses the Killkenny RR, abandoned and grass-grown, which leads to the base of Round Mountain and the WMNF trail through Willard Notch. Two more camps are passed, then the telephone line enters the path and continues there practically all the way. Passing through a gateway, the path follows a logging road and soon comes in sight of the North Branch, flowing from Bunnell Notch, and, after following its S bank for some time, becomes a path again.
About 2 m. from the White farm the path, which has thus far led directly toward Bunnell Notch, turns sharply N. It leads NW, then NE, and the real ascent of the mountain begins, the path following a zigzag course up the S ridge, and making a big loop to the S. from which there is a view into bare, fire-swept Bunnell Notch. The Mt. Cabot path from the E enters, and the two paths continue as one, to the summit. The path continues unmistakable, affording views of Lancaster, Mt. Lafayette and the Mount Washington Range.
For the last m. the path passes through a low, sweet-scented forest and comes out directly at the camp and tower. It is about 4 m. from the White farm to the summit. W Within 5 min. of the camp there is a spring, reached by continuing a few rods beyond the tower to a short trail descending to the E. 
Images:
1934-1938 USGS maps of Mt. Cabot
1934-1938 USGS maps of Mt. Cabot



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Last updated 2011-08-23
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